Entry by Merv Forney

A Body at Rest ...

  5 Comments

A body at rest tends to remain at rest. A body in motion tends to stay in motion.

I vaguely remember this from a high school physics class (and I mean vaguely). But, it is true. It is absolutely the hardest thing any of us has to do: step outside our comfort zone and dare to be different. The real challenge is to find the inertia (energy, motivation, need, etc.) to get the body at rest to begin moving. I think we have some of the best minds available to help you. Unlike other "motivational" coaching that is available everywhere, we practice what we preach.

Are you having a hard time getting started with your consulting approach and dialog? My experience is that if I give it my thought, rationalize it, role play with myself as both the consultant and client, it becomes ingrained into my being and talking about it, having confidence in it and selling it becomes second nature. If it is not part of you, it won't be effective.

Here are some articles I have written about the subject that appear on the Exchange and/or The Times Community. These are not referred to here to sell you on the concept of doing business differently. You already recognize the potential need to do that. They are referenced to get you thinking and talking differently to your prospects and clients.

Real Estate Consulting Fills the Choice Gap

Consulting is more than a fee schedule

Activity Based Pricing: The Pathway to Fee Schedules

Enjoy!

5 Comments

Just wanted to underscore what Merv said about a body at rest. We all have our comfort zones but one thing I know - the only thing constant in our world is change. You can embrace it and capitalize on being one of the first in your area to provide the consulting services that the public is wanting or you can stay "at rest" and wonder why "that consulting stuff just never worked for me".

We are here to help. Merv is right - we practice what we preach. The coaching we provide on this Exchange is the most valuable part of your course fee. Devote some time each day, as Gary David Hall suggested about any investment, to developing the tools in your consulting toolbox and then get the word out. In the current turmoil in our industry, you will provide clarity to the consumer and reap great rewards.

Mollie

I have to agree with Merv, practice does make perfect.

Why is it so difficult to practice regularly?

It is like learning a new language with Rosetta stone or Pimsler, daily practice is the only way to learn a new system.

Eventhough I know this, it is one of the most difficult things to do, I can get into "motion" easily but after a week or so things slow down or take other directions...do you agree?

Consulting IS like a new language Marjet. And like a new language,when you first start using it you'll struggle for words. But if you put in enough practice time, pretty soon, the words start rolling off your tongue. Then, the new language becomes a part of you and you can't imagine talking about real estate any other way.

This entry is a re-post from May, 2007. I adopted and believed in the principles of consulting from the very beginning of my real estate practice. But, I felt a bit unsure, did not have full self confidence and stuttered my first few times with potential clients. It took several conversations and presentations to get my "sea legs."

The point here is don't wait until you think you have the perfect presentation. Get started and hone your message as you gain experience.

Once in motion, it will be hard to slow down.

Thanks for the info and the links. I agree with your motion concept. you might add it is better to wear out than to rust out.

This page contains a single entry by Merv Forney published on March 2, 2011 11:50 AM.

Beyond Fee-For-Service Video was the previous entry in this blog.

Short Sale negotiation and fee schedules is the next entry in this blog.

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